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TREATMENT ROOM TABOO: Gloves or No Gloves?

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Posted: 02/20/2014 Professional Facials

 

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We’re always posting tips, tricks and news on Bioelements Facebook page, often sparking great conversation between both pros and spa-goers alike. Recently, posts demonstrating some of Bioelements Signature Techniques prompted comments, and even some questions, about the use of gloves during a treatment. Curious to hear how others felt about it, we opened the topic up with a question on our Facebook page. It turns out, some estheticians wear them from SkinReading until the end of the treatment. Others wear them only during extractions. Since it’s such a popular topic, and one I find important to any facial experience – for both the professional and the client – I want to talk about why I always encourage estheticians to use gloves in the treatment room, throughout the entire treatment.

It’s the law. Many states legally require that estheticians wear gloves during the extraction process to prevent the possible transmission of illness via blood or other bodily fluids. While this policy varies from state to state, it’s reason enough to wear gloves during and post extraction to keep both client and esthetician safe.

Products last longer. Rosie Grain put it perfectly in our Facebook conversation: “Product seems to penetrate better into the skin instead of my hands.” With the barrier of the glove between the skin of your hands and the skin care you’re using, your client gets 100% of the product and its benefits, and you use less product!

Your hands are your business. Have naturally cold hands? Love to garden and have hands that show it? Experiencing dryness from constant washing and sanitizing? With gloves, your client will never know. Gloves that fit properly will warm hands and cover them in a smooth texture that glides over the skin when product is applied, removing any distractions and making it a pleasant experience for both you and your client.

Nails are a no-no. In our Facebook conversation, Ashley Hoskison added, “dead skin stays under nails for quite some time and I feel gloves are more sanitary.” She’s right! No matter how short and well-kept your fingernails are, dirt, dead skin, and bacteria can build up beneath them during the facial, leaving both you and future clients open to infection.

You are a pro! Medical and dental professionals take the same care with gloves when they interact with patients – why not bring that same level of professionalism and authority into your treatment room?

THE KEY: Make sure your gloves fit properly. I love non-latex gloves that are so thin that I can still feel the texture and temperature of my client’s skin so there’s no worry of losing a connection between you, your client, and their skin. A properly fitting glove should hug the hand so there’s no excess material to make noise or slide around. Correctly-fitting gloves shouldn’t be noticed by a client and, in my experience, even estheticians (who typically don’t wear gloves during massage) have told me they couldn’t tell a difference when I gave them a facial while wearing them. Quite a few of you said the same of your clients in our Facebook conversation!

Skin care pros: Have you weighed in on this treatment room taboo? Comment with your thoughts in the Facebook post below! Spa-lovers: Have you ever noticed an esthetician was or was not wearing gloves during a facial?  Join in the conversation too!

Teresa Stenzel

Bioelements Director of Education Teresa Stenzel has been a member of the Bioelements esthetics team since 1993. With a key role in the company’s integration of new professional products, she helps develop new facial and body treatment techniques, as well as new curriculum for Bioelements, ensuring skin care professionals receive the education they need to deliver the best skin care recommendations and professional treatments from coast to coast.

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